Miss Bruna Costa

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About me

I am a Research Fellow at the Centre for Appearance Research. My research focuses on the psychosocial impact of appearance-altering health conditions, namely, craniofacial conditions including cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P), craniosynostosis, and craniofacial microsomia (CFM).

In my work, I enjoy collaborations with national and international researchers, academics, charitable organisations and health professionals, as well as experts by experience.

Currently, I am working on two high-profile projects (CARE and ACCORD), as well as a number of other smaller projects.

CARE (Craniofacial microsomia: Accelerating Research and Education) is a large-scale international study (based at two primary sites – UWE and Seattle Children's Research Institute), which includes members from 20+ disciplines and 7+ countries. Our primary aim is to learn more about, and contribute to the improvement of, the experiences of the CFM community.

ACCORD (Adults with Craniosynostosis: Creating Online Resources to reduce Distress) is a collaborative project with Headlines Craniofacial Support. Our aim is to co-produce (with experts by experience as well as specialist Clinical Psychologists) and evaluate psychosocial support resources for adults with craniosynostosis.

I am also a trainee health psychologist, with a particular interest in disparities and inequalities in the areas of health, (health) psychology, and visible difference. My thesis is titled: The experiences of young Somali adults with visible facial differences: A qualitative study.

I supervise and mentor Masters and Undergraduate (dissertation and placement) students at UWE, and assist the Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences by delivering invited seminars and lectures, as well as supporting with student assessment.

My research can be found in a range of leading academic journals. Please see below for a list of recent publications, or read more about my work on Research Gate.

Publications

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