Dr Emma Stone

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  • Qualifications:PhD (University of Bristol), MSc (ManMet), BSc Hons Geography (University of Plymouth)
  • Position:Lecturer Environmental Sciences
  • Department:Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences (HAS)
  • Telephone:+4411732 85145
  • Email:Emma4.Stone@uwe.ac.uk
  • Social media: LinkedIn logo Twitter logo Facebook logo

About me

Biography

Previous experience

I have worked in conservation research for over 20 years. To date most of my research has been in Africa. After completing my undergraduate degree I worked for six years in Zambia as a Assistant Research Coordinator on the Biodiversity Project in Kafue National Park and Project Manager at Munda Wanga Wildlife Park. During this time I was involved in many different projects from field research and monitoring to welfare based rehabilitation, education and awareness projects. Whilst in Zambia I undertook research with a variety of species, as conducting a biodiversity survey meant I had to become familiar with most groups including, birds, butterflies, beetles, reptiles, amphibians, large and small mammals - including bats.

I have also worked on various short term projects, including an Education Display Coordinator for the Philippines Outreach project at Chester Zoo; a nine month project studying the impact of domestic cats on wildlife in Bristol funded by MTUK, and Assisting Ecologist studying African wild dogs in South Luangwa National Park.

Recently I have founded and manage Conservation Research Africa (CRA), a research charity based in Malawi where I manage a successful multidisciplinary research programme assessing the impacts of global environmental change (GEC) on wildlife and society.

www.africanbatconservation.org  www.carnivoreresearchmalawi.org www.conservationresearchafrica.org​

Awards

2011 - Faculty of Science Commendation of Excellence for my PhD thesis (University of Bristol)

2010 - Vincent Weir Scientific National Award for my contribution to the conservation biology of UK bats through my PhD research

2009 – Acorn Ecology Prize – for best student paper at the Mammal Society Easter Conference

2005 - Environmental and Behavioural Biology Prize - best performance for MSc research

Area of expertise

My research is focused on understanding the dynamic interrelations between ecosystems, society and poverty. I use a novel interdisciplinary approach to Global Environmental Change (GEC) research, combining social-ecological-geographical methods to predict and understand the impacts of urbanisation and agricultural expansion on biodiversity. Using bats as models I am assessing the impact of agricultural land use change (across gradients of intensity) on biodiversity in Malawi. I have recently completed a Leverhulme Trust funded research project assessing ecosystem service provision of bats in agro-forestry plantations and smallholder farms in Malawi as Co-I with Professor Gareth Jones, University of Bristol.

I am currently conducting ongoing long term research in Lilongwe city (Malawi) to assess the socio-cultural-economic drivers of human-wildlife-conflict (HWC), spatial and behavioural ecology of urban bats and carnivores, and impacts of urbanisation on biodiversity and human health. I am using bats and spotted hyaena’s (Crocuta crocuta) as models to assess the impacts of urbanisation on biodiversity and the risks to human health from wildlife trade, consumption, and cultural use as a function of increasing urbanisation. I am conducting long-term ongoing research to understand the welfare and conservation implications of animal reintroductions and translocations using primates and carnivores as models. I coordinate a long-term primate reintroduction programme of rehabilitated yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus) and vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) into Kasungu National Park, and am preparing two publications from a five year data set to assess welfare success of these reintroductions. With funding from Panthera, I am assessing the welfare and spatial behaviour of reintroduced serval (Letpailurus serval) into Kasungu national Park, Malawi, using satellite tracking to be completed in 2019. 

Publications

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