Professor Clara Greed

About me

Dr Clara Greed is emerita professor of inclusive urban planning and is now semi-retired but is still active in research, writing and campaigning. She is a member of the Royal Town Planning Institute and other built environment bodies​. Clara's activities are focused upon the built environment, architecture, planning and urban social issues.  She has become infamous for her research and publications on the importance of public toilet provision within the context of urban design and the social aspects of planning.  Public toilets are the missing link in creating sustainable, equitable and accessible cities, and are an essential facility for people when walking, cycling and travelling by public transport.   In recent years she has returned to her previous interest in urban theology and the relationship between religion and urban structure, and the emergence of the post-secular city. The link between toilets and places of worship is that they both 'social facilities' that cater for basic human needs but which are often trivialised, undervalued and overlooked by the planners.  
Many have asked me about reading the publications of my late husband John Greed, law lecturer, and these can still be accessed at www.johngreed.me.uk. 
To contact Clara directly email claragreed@aol.com or phone 01275 844448

Area of expertise

Whist she is interested in all aspects of urban spatial and social policy, her expertise focuses upon the social aspects of planning and has long worked on 'women and planning', gender, equality, disability, urban design, accessibility and other diversity issues including public toilet provision.   She has served on British Standards committees and developed BS6456 Part 4 on Sanitary Installations which for the first time set requirements for public toilet provision. Currently she is completing research with the Building Research Establishment on the revision of workplace toilet provision. She continues to investigate the problems that Pentecostal mega-churches in the UK have in trying to getting planning permission to house their large congregations whether they can, including in ex-cinemas, community centres, industrial units. Given that many such churches comprise African and other non-traditional congregations there is an added element of racism to address too.

My Publications