Dr Scott Jones

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About me

Having received a First-class BSc (Hons) in Psychology from the University of the West of England, I then completed my PhD at Cardiff University. My PhD explored the potential applications of learning theory, and other engineering frameworks, to improve human identification of previous unfamiliar faces. 

Following the completion of my PhD, I held postdoctoral positions within the Brain and Cognition group at Anglia Ruskin University and within the Visual Experience Laboratory at the University of Birmingham. During these roles, I have been trained to use a variety of techniques including; eye tracking, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and EEG. My position at Birmingham was funded by the International Banknote Designers Association. This role involved collaborating with the central banks (e.g., the Bank of England, US Federal Reserve) and other stakeholders to design perception studies. The main focus of these studies was to investigate how individuals navigate and use of the design features on secure documents. 

More recently, I have held the positions of Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer at Bath Spa University teaching and leading on a range of modules including: Introduction to Cognitive and Comparative Neuroscience and Advanced Biological and Cognitive Psychology. At UWE, I teach on Research Design and Analysis 1; Mind, Brain and Development; Cognitive Neuropsychology. In addition I supervise dissertation projects within my areas of expertise.    


Area of expertise

Broadly, my research interests focus on visual perception/attention and how our interpretation of the world can be influenced by prior experience, what we are viewing, and current internal state. I am interested in the basic mechanisms and associated brain areas that underpin learning through simple exposure (i.e., Perceptual learning). In addition to applying this knowledge to investigate how we learn to identify previously unfamiliar faces and other frequently encountered objects. 

Publications

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